Water-to-Go supports World Oceans Day

World Oceans Day is a global day of ocean celebration and collaboration for a better future held every year on 8th June. It is a global initiative bringing communities together from across the world to fight for a healthier marine environment and to raise awareness of the crucial role the oceans play in our lives. Different themes are assigned to World Oceans Day and in 2018, the theme is Preventing Plastic Pollution. This is to bring awareness about the threats our oceans are under and to encourage solutions to ensure a healthier ocean and a better future for us all.

Numerous events are held around the world every year to mark World Oceans Day and this year is almost more poignant. As well as photo contests, fossil hunting walks, demonstrations, and concerts there will be more beach clean-ups and plastic pick-ups this year as we look to take actions to ensure the sustainable future of our ocean.

By using a Water-to-Go bottle, you can do your part to protect the World’s Oceans by using an environmentally friendly alternative to single-use plastic water bottles that contaminate our oceans. You can save money as well as saving the planet by not needing to purchase overpriced bottled water.

Water-to-Go seek to protect our customers’ health and well-being by offering safe, healthy water anywhere in the world but to also protect our planet by offering an environmentally friendly reusable alternative to single-use plastic water bottles.

Water-to-Go are working with travel companies to help fulfil their role as responsible tour operators

Water-to-Go is working with several leading companies in the area of reducing their carbon footprint, and ensuring that their clients travel responsibly and safely. Water-to-Go have recently partnered up with UK tour company, Explore, to further their philosophy of responsible tourism. Explore are actively promoting Water-to-Go as essential kit on their trips so that their customers have access to safe, clean drinking wherever they are.

Water-to-Go offers a brandable reusable filter water bottle which will ensure their clients and customers have no need to contribute to the blight caused by single-use plastic water bottles, also filtering out harmful contaminants.

Port of London Authority (PLA) announced plans to stop using single-use plastics for World Ocean Day by partnering up with Water-to-Go

The PLA has partnered with  Water-to-Go to provide specialised bottles to the crews of their vessels to save on their usage of single-use plastic water bottles and protect our oceans. Dave Shanks, Founder of Water-to-Go said:

“I’m delighted to see them being used on port authority vessels on the Thames.  If our assistance can help the PLA achieve its single-use plastic free goal, it’ll be a great and noteworthy result.”

“Single-use plastic bottles for water are a blight, wherever you go in the world.  Our bottles provide everyone with the chance to access clean, filtered, water on the go.”

Water-to-Go is doing its part by educating plus informing their consumers and partners on the perils of destroying marine life in the world’s oceans as well as being personally responsible for one’s usage of plastics in everyday life.

The issue of plastics pollutions has been pushed more into the public consciousness through Sir David Attenborough’s “Blue Planet II” programme and images of the catastrophic impact plastic waste is having on marine wildlife. This article by SLO Active highlights the impact of plastic pollution on our oceans and what we can do about it

Plastic Pollution – Single Use Plastic Impact on our Oceans

This has prompted actions to be taken by organisations, governments and authorities to tackle the problem. Organisations such as Surfers against Sewage and the Marine Conservation Society advocate beach clean campaigns throughout the year to protect our oceans and this is replicated all over the world.

The Ocean Project

The Ocean Project has been the global leader for coordinating and growing the event for over 15 years. The organisation was founded to advance ocean conservation in partnership with aquariums, zoos, museums, and other youth and visitor-serving organisations around the world. Back in 1999, it instigated the most comprehensive research ever carried out on the public’s attitudes to, and understanding of, oceans and the environment. This prompted a complete rethink around how aquariums and other attractions present their exhibits and how they communicate and engage visitors with conservation.

Today, The Ocean Project’s partner network numbers around 2,000 organisations. It continues to offer support with public opinion and communications research, strategic insights, and support for innovative and effective public engagement, and conservation impact.

The world’s oceans play a key role for life on Earth

70% of our planet is covered by one huge, continuous body of seawater – the ocean. It holds 1.35 billion cubic kilometres of water and plays a huge role for us and marine life. According to the UN, they are “the lungs of our planet, providing most of the oxygen we breathe, [as well as] a major source of food and medicines and a critical part of the biosphere.” In the past few decades, the threats from pollution, overfishing and other forms of exploitation to marine habitats have increased dramatically.

The Ocean Conference called for the engagement of all relevant stakeholders, bringing together Governments, the United Nations system, other intergovernmental organizations, academic institutions, the scientific community, the private sector, philanthropic organizations, civil society, mayors, children, youth and others who will utilize this momentum to galvanize action-oriented partnerships at all levels – local, national and global – that provide lasting and long-term solutions to protect our oceans.

Read more about how to mark World Environment Day with Water-to-Go and what else is being done to tackle plastic pollution in our previous blog.

Chasing Gandhi’s Shadow: Olie Hunter Smart completes his 4,500km walk the length of India

In April 2017, Olie Hunter Smart set off on a solo journey to walk the length of India to uncover untold stories of Independence and Partition that took place in 1947.  He’s just returned to the UK and shares his story with us.  You can read about the background to his journey here.

Olie’s route through India

As I stared out of the aeroplane window on my way up to Ladakh, I thought I’d bitten off more than I could chew.  Not only did the plains of India look hot, dry and particularly arid, but the Himalayas looked huge and the snowy conditions were not something I was experienced with. 

Looking down at the folds that make up the Himalayas

However, I soon became distracted by the beauty of the mountain landscape; deep purple mountains capped in white snow; huge sunny skies and crisp fresh air; and the gentle sound of prayer wheels spinning as people went about their daily routines.  It was magical.  I was excited about the long journey that lay ahead.

Mountain scenes and snowy peaks of Ladakh

After a few days of acclimatisation, I set off with a guide essential to navigating the mountain trails that would take us off the roads, following valleys and climbing high mountain passes that blocked the route south.  We carried food with us so as not to be a burden on the remote communities we passed through, increasing my already heavy bag to around 28 kilos.  Thankfully, the Water-to-Go bottles saved us valuable weight as we filled up from icy cold snow melt streams.  It was so thirst quenching!

I filled up from ice-cold streams while trekking in the Himalayas

As we emerged from the mountain trails some 5 weeks later, I waved goodbye to the guide and set off for the dusty plains of northern India.  Temperatures soared to a staggering 48 degrees so it was critical that I kept cool and remained hydrated.  I discovered this area was heavily impacted by Partition that took place following Independence in 1947.  Millions of people fled, escaping violence and persecution as Hindu ruled East Punjab and Muslim ruled West Punjab were divided.

An elder I spoke to along my route

Most nights I stayed with families which gave me the opportunity to hear elders recounting their experience of that traumatic period of history; I found myself wincing at their accounts of the brutality, the stories of families fleeing their homes never to return, or of fathers giving their children daggers to use on themselves to avoid being subjected to violence and abuse.  I was very moved by their descriptions, something I had not anticipated hearing, but that was reality for them.

Would you walk along the railway lines in India?

I followed the railway line south, it being more direct as well as keeping me off the roads and away from the dangerous traffic and pollution.  I passed through Delhi and onto Rajasthan where I continued to hear similarly tragic stories about Partition, but on occasion was pleasantly surprised to come across a few positive stories from people who had been able to change their financial situation having set up successful businesses.  Food flavours were now changing every 100 kilometres or so as the agriculture influenced the dishes I was eating.  By now I’d been on the road for almost 4 months but I was loving rural India.

I’d been looking forward to the Salt March, the inspiration for my journey, since the start.  Today the route has become somewhat a heritage route making it far easier to navigate, yet the difficulty came in each village when trying to find various plaques or statues commemorating Gandhi’s walk in 1930.  Fortunately, the locals knew it well and took great pleasure in showing me around their community, regaling historical stories to boot.  I reached Dandi where Gandhi broke the salt law, realising that I was now over half way through my journey.  It was an emotional moment.

No longer reliant on Google maps as my route was marked to Dandi!

Back on the road I worked my way down to the busting city of Mumbai.  India is well set up for constant refills of your own bottle in the hot climate, whether it be a hand pump or well in a village, a tap on a railway platform or from the increasing number of reverse osmosis stations set up in villages to provide clean water to the communities. My Water-to-Go bottle provided me with consistently good quality and safe water from whatever source I found.

I would fill up anywhere I could find fresh water along my route

By now I was beginning to get increasingly frustrated with life on the road – the hooting, incessant demands for selfies and that spicy food.  Couldn’t I just have cereal for breakfast?!  I’d been walking for 6 months, but it was only when I worked my way uphill to Pune that I realised I had spent the best part of three months in the flat plains of India.  There had been no texture in the landscape, nothing on the horizon to aim for.  I’d been missing the hills, so I made it my mission to find a place to camp next to a lake, and soon enough I found the perfect spot!

Finding a place to camp was tricky, but on occasions I found the ideal spot

I continued south, meeting some freedom fighters that had fought alongside Mahatma Gandhi in the struggle for freedom, many of whom were over 90 years old.  As I neared Mysore I was confident with my progress until one day someone asked me how I would avoid being attacked by a tiger.  Tigers?!  They’d not even crossed my mind this far south.  I carried on, getting increasingly worried as I went, trying to figure out alternative routes.  I spent half a day with all senses on edge as I walked steadily through a tiger reserve, completely petrified.

Should I heed the warning signs?

That night I resolved to find a driver who could shadow me for the next stretch of forest.  The following morning, he arrived and I set off, safe in the knowledge that there was an extra pair of eyes on the lookout.  Relief ran through my veins as I reached the end of the forest and the safety of a temple that night.

Kanyakumari in my sights!

Kanyakumari was in my sights, but there was one final obstacle I had to overcome – Cyclone Ockhi with her devastating wind and rain.  Having already walked through monsoon rains I was determined not to be put off by some adverse weather and ploughed on, reaching the very southern tip of India on 6th December.  After seven and a half months on foot, I’d made it!  What an incredible way to experience real India!

With nowhere else to go, I can now relax!

Olie is currently working on a documentary of his journey. 

To find out the latest, follow @oliehuntersmart on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

World Water Day 2018 – what are we doing to help?

Today (22 March) is World Water Day, a poignant time when people all over the world are raising awareness about the importance of water and how we can solve the global water crisis.

Here at Water-to-Go, we know all about the importance of water and want everyone to see the benefits of drinking plenty of it. Water is the key to life as every system in our body depends on it. However, it is more than just essential to quench thirst or protect health; water is vital for creating jobs and supporting economic, social, and human development.

The problem is that there are many people around the world who do not have the luxury of safe, clean water on their doorstep like us in the developed world. Today, around 1.9 billion people live in areas where water is already scarce and 2.1 billion people live without safe drinking water at home; affecting their health, education and livelihoods.

In 2015, UN Member States adopted the historic 2030 Agenda, setting 17 universal and transformative goals, and committing to working tirelessly for their full implementation. Goal 6 is to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.

The United Nations has long been addressing the global crisis caused by unsafe water and sanitation and growing demands on the world’s water resources to meet human, economic and environmental needs. According to them, the answer is in nature.

A major part of the solution is to produce less pollution and improve the way we manage wastewater. We have heard it before but a circular economy is imperative to the sustainability of the planet.

A more circular and therefore more sustainable economy requires us to value wastewater for its potential, rather than discard or ignore it. More than just an alternative source of water, safe wastewater management could help protect our ecosystems and give us energy, nutrients and other recoverable materials.

UN Water

It is crucial that we make safe, clean water for health and sanitation universally available all over the world and this starts with addressing how wastewater is managed according to the UN. If we don’t do this, people will continue to be drinking contaminated water and putting themselves at risk of serious illnesses.

Globally, 80% of wastewater flows back into the ecosystem without being treated or reused, contributing to a situation where around 1.8 billion people use a source of drinking water contaminated with faeces, putting them at risk of contracting cholera, dysentery, typhoid and polio.

UN Water

If these people had a Water-to-Go bottle, they wouldn’t be at risk to these illnesses such as cholera and polio. Our unique 3-in-1 filter technology eliminates well in excess of 99.9% of microbiological contaminants including viruses and bacteria from any non-salt water source in the world.

Photo credit: Alexandra Daniels

Water-to-Go are currently working with The Hunger Project – a global NGO who are committed to the sustainable end of world hunger and poverty by 2030 in accordance with the Sustainable Development Goals. One of the main aspects of their work is to ensure the communities have access to safe, clean water in order to improve health, sanitation and hygiene. As a result, this allows the community to become self-sufficient which is ultimately the main aim of these programs. These people are able to go to school, to work and essentially establish a sustainable life in which they then turn providers for people in need. They become the agents of their own development and make sustainable progress in overcoming hunger and poverty.

So far, we have managed to raise $16,500 USD to The Hunger Project from our most recent campaign and now we are looking to enter new markets with them, starting soon in Germany.

Have a look at our project in more detail.

The human rights to safe drinking water and sanitation are a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous & sustainable world. Ending poverty and relieving world hunger begins with water. It is fundamental to our being and is imperative to our sustainable future.

Water-to-Go are also delighted to be working with Explore – an award-winning tour company who specialises in small group adventure holidays and travel tours for every kind of customer. We are helping them raise funds for the incredible work that they and the charities they support do around the world. Explore are very proud to support Toilet Twinning and their inspirational work. This fantastic charity is raising funds to enable people living in poor communities to have clean water, a decent toilet, and to learn about hygiene. Explore have also partnered up with Send a Cow who work in Africa to provide families with much needed support such as seeds, livestock and practical training.

Explore are thrilled to have found an innovative product that we can confidently recommend to our customers keeping them safe, whilst reducing our environmental impact in destination and, more specifically, the use of plastic water bottles. As a responsible company partnering with Water-to-Go is a really positive step toward making a change.

Explore

So this World Water Day, remember that there are many people around the world who don’t have access to safe, clean water and think about what you can do to help. Here are some interesting ideas from UN Environment.

Water-to-Go is a sustainable solution to plastic pollution and the global water crisis. We are looking to work further with these organisations and other charities and businesses to help as many people in the world access clean water.

Every person in the world needs clean, contamination-free water to survive. At Water-to-Go we want to give the World safe, clean water that they can afford. We also want to help put an end to the damage to the planet created by plastic waste.

Our technology is simple and easy to use and with the correct distribution, we can help counter the impact on some of the World’s most horrific water borne diseases. Whilst fulfilling this aim, we can help minimize the damage done to the environment from single-use plastic bottles.

We work together with organisations that share our aims and goals and together we can change the world, one bottle, one person at a time.

Do you share our vision and goals? If so, please get in contact as we would love to hear from you.

Previous blogs:

World Water Day 2018 – Solutions to the global water crisis

In our previous blog post, we mentioned that people all over the world are raising awareness about the importance of water and how we can solve the global water crisis as part of World Water Day 2018 which is happening on 22 March.

The United Nations has long been addressing the global crisis caused by unsafe water and sanitation and growing demands on the world’s water resources to meet human, economic and environmental needs. According to them, the answer is in nature.

A major part of the solution is to produce less pollution and improve the way we manage wastewater. We have heard it before but a circular economy is imperative to the sustainability of the planet. Prince Charles cited this when speaking at the ‘Our Ocean’ conference in Malta in October 2017. Although this talk plastic pollution in our oceans, a circular economy would affect all aspects of sustainable development. He highlighted that “this economic approach has to be a critical part of establishing a more harmonious relationship between humankind and the ocean that sustains us all.”

A more circular and therefore more sustainable economy requires us to value wastewater for its potential, rather than discard or ignore it. More than just an alternative source of water, safe wastewater management could help protect our ecosystems and give us energy, nutrients and other recoverable materials.

UN Water

Around 1.9 billion people live in areas where water is already scarce and this is just not acceptable. It is largely as a result of unfortunate natural disasters that cause absolute devastation in certain parts of the world. Even people who live in areas where there is running water, over 2 billion of them live without safe drinking water at home; affecting their health, education and livelihoods. We explored the importance of water as an essential building block of life in our previous blog post. This crisis will have far more consequences than we realise unless we pull together to address the problem. Hopefully, through World Water Day and the upcoming High-Level Political Forum later this year, the United Nations and other authorities will be able to address any issues and accelerate the progress of the Sustainable Development Goals.

We have to make safe, clean water for health and sanitation universally available all over the world and this starts with addressing how wastewater is managed according to the UN. We are getting to a stage where we have to think twice about how we use natural resources and how we can be more efficient as a global economy. Furthermore, as mentioned earlier, a circular economy would help accelerate progress and help us all commit to a sustainable future. These resources need to be recovered, recycled and reused instead of just thrown away.

The availability of safe and sufficient water supplies is inextricably linked to how wastewater is managed. Increased amounts of untreated sewage, combined with agricultural runoff and industrial discharge, have degraded water quality and contaminated water resources around the world.

UN Water

Another sustainable solution to our water crisis and plastic pollution is Water-to-Go. Our reusable filter bottle is the perfect alternative to single-use plastic bottles and gives you guaranteed access to safe, clean drinking water from any non-salt water source in the world.

Our unique 3-in-1 filters eliminate well in excess of 99.9% of microbiological contaminants including viruses, bacteria, chemicals and heavy metals from water leaving you with clean, safe water anytime, anywhere.

Find out in our next blog post what Water-to-Go are doing to help and progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals. Find out more about the Sustainable Development Goals here in this video.

Other blog posts: 

World Water Day 2018 – why water is an essential building block of life

In our previous blog post, we mentioned that water is an essential building block of life. It is more than just essential to quench thirst or protect health; water is vital for creating jobs and supporting economic, social, and human development.

People all over the world are raising awareness about the importance of water and how we can solve the global water crisis as part of World Water Day 2018 (22 March). You can read more about World Water Day 2018 in our previous blog.

Here at Water-to-Go, we know all about the importance of water and want everyone to see the benefits of drinking plenty of it. We all know that every person in the world needs clean contamination free water to survive so, at Water-to-Go, we want to give the World safe clean water that they can afford.

Water is the key to life — every system in our body depends on it. It is the solvent that transports many essential molecules and other particles around the body. Therefore, water helps carry nutrients to our cells, helps rid toxins from our organs, and keeps our nose, ears, and throat moist. Water makes up around 70% of us. It helps the body function, maintaining physical and mental health.

Around 1.9 billion people live in areas where water is already scarce. We have a very privileged life in Europe and the developed world as we have safe, clean water at our fingertips. Many people in the world, as we are all too aware, don’t have this luxury and we need to tackle this problem. This then affects their health and, as a result, affects their education, work and development.

It takes huge amounts of water to grow food for example. Globally we use 70% of our water sources for agriculture and irrigation, and only 10% on domestic uses. So, a huge part of the day for people in third-world countries is spent collecting water for domestic use as well as agriculture.

Women and children spend 258 million hours every day collecting water. This is time that could be spent working, caring for family, or attending school. Less time getting water means more time for life.

Water.org

The United Nations have realised that we need to accelerate progress and development in third-world countries with regards to improving water and sanitation. As a result, there will be a High-Level Political Forum later this year in July to review the Sustainable Development Goals in the hope to strengthen the means of implementation. Goal 6 is to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. This will be the first point of conversation as this is the main building block for sustainable development to take place.

The human rights to safe drinking water and sanitation are a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous & sustainable world. Ending poverty and relieving world hunger, for example, begins with water. It is fundamental to our being and is imperative to our sustainable future.

Relieving hunger in Africa has to begin with access to clean water. It may seem simple, but we forget that without access to a reliable source of water, food is hard to grow and even more difficult to preserve and prepare.

The Water Project

The UN say that the answer to our global water crisis is in nature. Good water quality is essential to human health, social and economic development, and the ecosystem. However, as populations grow and natural environments become degraded, ensuring there are sufficient and safe water supplies for everyone is becoming increasingly challenging. A major part of the solution is to produce less pollution and improve the way we manage wastewater.

Globally, 80% of wastewater flows back into the ecosystem without being treated or reused, contributing to a situation where around 1.8 billion people use a source of drinking water contaminated with faeces, putting them at risk of contracting cholera, dysentery, typhoid and polio.

UN Water

If these people had a Water-to-Go bottle, they wouldn’t be at risk to these illnesses such as cholera and polio. Our unique 3-in-1 filter technology eliminates well in excess of 99.9% of microbiological contaminants including viruses and bacteria from any non-salt water source in the world.

The UN are highlighting that there are solutions but they will take time to implement. Water-to-Go are looking to do our bit for World Water Day and will announce this in due course. Water-to-Go is a sustainable solution to this crisis so join our journey and support us to help make a difference.

Other blog posts:

 

Water Purification Methods…

Whether you’re getting close with nature in the great outdoors or drinking from questionable taps on your gap year, holiday, backpacking or hiking adventure you’re going to need safe access to water.

Coming down with the dreaded ‘Delhi Belly’ or ‘Travellers Diarrhoea’ can wipe out an entire trip or holiday, not to mention the more serious contamination that can be lurking in untreated water.

Travelling outside of the UK, you are exposed to a number of different water contaminants that often force us to rely on bottled water (which is extremely bad for the environment, not to mention the vast expense).

Hepatitis A, E.Coli, Cholera, Weils’s Disease, Giardia, Legionnaires Disease and Cryptosporidium to name a few!

The only way to make sure what is in our water when we’re away from home is to treat it ourselves. But, what is the best method for purifying water?

Let’s take a look at the some of the different methods for treating water:

Boiling

pot-883036_1920Boiling water to remove unwanted germs is the oldest trick in the book. It’s extremely effective in eliminating microbiological contaminants from the water. It’s recommended to bring the water to a rolling boil for a minimum of 1 minute to purify it. At an altitude above 2,000 metres you should increase this to 3 minutes.

What does boiling water remove: Microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses and protozoa.

What doesn’t boiling water remove: heavy metals such as lead, debris, nitrates and pesticides.

Advantages of boiling water: Very effective for removing harmful organisms, no cost involved.

Disadvantages of boiling water: Time consuming; access to heating method required E.g. fire, stove or kettle, not effective against potentially harmful chemicals or metals that may be in the water. Smell and taste are not improved.

Purification Tablets/Halogens

Purification tablets/halogens, have always been pill-in-water-1529109-639x1052a popular choice for outdoor trekkers and travellers to treat water. For a time, they were the only alternative to boiling water. Essentially they use chemicals to kill off microbiological contaminants from the water. Iodine was traditionally used to purify water. However, in 2009, The European Union (EU) banned the sale of Iodine for use in disinfecting drinking water due to it’s associated health risks. The most common tablets or drops used are made from chlorine, silver or chlorine dioxide.

What do purification tablets kill: Microorganisms such as Bactria, viruses, cysts (depending on type).

What don’t purification tablets remove: Chemicals, pesticides, heavy metals, sediment.

Advantages of purification tablets: Small and Lightweight, cheap and cost effective.

Disadvantages of purification tablets: Usually a minimum wait-time of 30 minutes. Some require a wait-time of up to 4 hours to kill contaminants such as cryptosporidium. After the water has been treated, you then still drink the chemicals and additives. Usually have a foul taste.

Ultraviolet Light (UV)

uvwaterfilterUsing UV light to purify water is great for neutralising microbiological contaminants such as bacteria, viruses and cysts. They are operated using batteries and are usually small (often in a pen form) and lightweight. There are also versions of the technology in water bottles as well. The process is very quick, usually taking 60-90 seconds.

What does UV light kill: Microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses and protozoa.

What doesn’t UV light remove: Chemicals, heavy metals sediments and debris.

Advantages of UV light: Small and lightweight (depending on type).

Disadvantages of UV light: Relies on batteries (restricted access to batteries when travelling). Won’t remove any sediment or debris, taste or odours.

Water Filters

poresize copyWater filters are fantastic for dealing with all types of different water contaminants (depending on which one you go for). They traditionally involve drawing water through a microscopic hole (pore) by pumping or sucking. Most water filters for outdoor use or travel will be able to deal with bacteria and protozoa (Cryptosporidium and Giardia lamblia for example). Very few are equipped to deal with viruses.

Water filters for gap years, outdoor use and travel, come in a variety of formats including straws, pump units and water bottles.

Some water filters use a simple ‘carbon block’ technology. These are known as charcoal filters or activated carbon filters. Whilst these types of filters are excellent to reduce chemicals, and odours in domestic tap water they are not recommended to be used with untreated water such as rivers, streams or suspect tap water abroad.

Some water filters will combine a number of different filtering methods that will also remove viruses from the water as well as a large number of chemicals, heavy metals and pesticides.

What do water filters remove: Most should eliminate bacteria and cysts. Some will filter viruses if they have a combination of technologies or a small enough pore size. Some will even eliminate chemicals, heavy metals and pesticides.

What don’t water filters remove: Depends on type.

Advantages of water filters: Usually light, portable, quick and cost effective (depending on type).

Disadvantages of water filters: Filters will eventually need to be replaced. Flow rate may be slow (depending on type).

Traditionally when choosing a water filter, the most important question was ‘what is the pore size’. When you’re dealing with microbiological contaminants there are 3 key groups that need to be considered.

  • Protozoan cysts E.g. Cryptosporidium and Giardia lamblia. These range from 1 to 300 microns in size.
  • Bacteria E.g. Escherichia coli (E. coli), Leptospira. These range from 0.1 to 10 microns.
  • Viruses E.g. Hepatitis A, Polio, tota virus, rotavirus, enterovirus, norovirus, Norwalk virus. These are extremely small and range from 0.005 to 0.1 micron.

Unless the filter has a small enough pore size to deal with all of the above, or has a combination of technologies then it will be restricted in what it removes. Wanderlust Magazine, recently compared and reviewed a number of different water filters currently available.

When talking about the pore size, we refer back to standard technology. The mechanical restriction of the size of the pores has been the traditional 
measure of what a filter will eliminate. This is not the case with all filters. For example, Water-to-Go uses a unique combination of three technologies, each performs individually but it is the combination that makes it unique. Water-to-Go use a combination of two nano technologies, which not only reduce the pore size to 0.7 microns, but also create a positive hydrostatic charge in the membrane which attract and traps even the smallest of viruses!

backgrounds for photographyIn addition to the nano technology used in Water-to-Go filter water bottles, activated carbon is used. However, instead of glueing them into a block (which loses 60% of its efficiency), it is incorporated into the membrane so it works at maximise the benefits.

What does Water-to-Go remove: All microbiological contaminants including Bacteria, Viruses, Protozoa, Cysts, Chemicals like chlorine and fluoride, heavy metals like copper and lead as well as pesticides. See full list.

What doesn’t Water-to-Go remove: The positively charged minerals, E.g. calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium.

Advantages of Water-to-Go: Small and lightweight. Cost effective. Fast Flow rate (10-12ml per second) Works instantly, doesn’t require batteries, eliminates bad taste and odours.

Disadvantages of Water-to-Go: Replaceable filter (however, these are low cost and last up to 200 litres).

The 3 technologies in Water-to-Go water bottles far exceeds the EPA requirements for microbiological filtration. Water-to-Go achieves the following reduction:

  • 6 log10 (99.9999%) for Bacteria
  • 5-6 log10 (99.999-99.9999%) for Viruses
  • 4 log10 (99.99%) Microorganisms
  • 3 log10 (99.9%) Chemicals (Chlorine, Fluoride),  Heavy Metals (lead, copper) and Pesticides.

Have a look at the Water-to-Go bottle in action:

 

£1 from every product ordered donated to Raleigh International…

Raleigh International is a sustainable development charity that exists to create lasting change through youth.

Raleigh, believe that when local communities and young people work side by side it empowers them, and it’s the energy and motivation of empowered people that creates lasting change.

A core strategic priority for Raleigh is WASH: Water, Sanitation and Hygiene.

Raleigh want to help meet the Global Goal for Sustainable Development 6 – ‘ensure water and sanitation for all’. Raleigh pursues a holistic approach to WASH interventions by inspiring behavioural change – better hygiene practises can save lives. In rural schools, homes and communities, they achieve transformational change by supporting young women and men to have access to safe water, and sanitation.

Because Raleigh projects deliver safe, clean water in Malaysian Borneo, Nicaragua, Nepal and Tanzania, Water-to-Go has pledged to donate £1 per product sold in the online store between 16th May and 29th May.

Buy a Water-to-Go product today and play your part in changing lives!

For more information on Raleigh International and the amazing work they do, check out their website www.raleighinternational.org

Water-to-Go will donate £1 per item sold. This includes all products including bottles, filters and lids. 

 

Walking The Zambezi

Adventurer and expedition leader Chaz Powell is set to become the first ever person to walk the entire length of the Zambezi River in one outing while raising money and awareness for wildlife conservation. Setting out in August, Chaz will walk for 6 months through the driest and hottest months of the year in order to find safe passage through the floodplains and finishing this gruelling challenge during the November to January wet season.

36 year old Powell from Shropshire is aiming to go one better than David Lemon who, at an incredible 69 years of age, was the first person to walk the Zambezi River in two stages, excluding its path through Angola where he failed to obtain a Visa. Chaz will start this mammoth, 1600 mile, expedition from the Zambezi source in North Western Zambia, passing through Angola for 150 miles, back into Zambia, then crossing through Mozambique until finally reaching the river’s mouth at the Indian Ocean.

Lemon has given Chaz his full support and offers these words of encouragement “Known as ‘The Mighty Zambezi’ throughout most of Africa, The Zambezi River has captured the imagination of Mankind through the ages. Having walked it myself, I know what Chaz Powell faces and wish him all the luck in the world. Believe me Chaz, when you reach the sea at Chinde, it will be the high spot of your life and a moment that will live in your memory for ever.”

Money raised from the feat will be donated to the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation (DSWF).

“I chose to raise money for the DSWF because they show the same passion and commitment that I’d need for this challenge to fight wildlife crime and protect endangered wildlife. I feel we can work together to make a huge difference.”

The David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation (DSWF) is a non-profit organisation funding key projects in Africa and Asia working to save critically endangered animals in the wild. Founded in 1981 by wildlife artist and conservationist, David Shepherd CBE, the charity works to fight wildlife crime and protect precious wildlife populations by engaging with local people to nurture long-term, sustainable solutions to human-animal conflicts.

“Every year our Wildlife Warrior fundraising volunteers play a critical role in raising much-needed funds to support our conservation projects in Africa and Asia working to protect some of the world’s most endangered and iconic animals,” said DSWF CEO Sally Case. “We are immensely grateful to Chaz for committing such an amazing amount of energy and time on behalf of the charity. To walk the Zambezi River, solo and unaided, is such a massive challenge both physically and mentally and we will support him with every step.”

He plans to walk solo and unaided, relying on help from people along the river for food and accommodation as well as carrying all equipment needed to survive alone such as camping equipment and dry foods.

“Being a passionate adventurer I want to challenge myself in the wildest of environments and have an itch to walk a relatively unexplored region” says Chaz. “My main aim during the walk is to raise money and awareness for wildlife conservation throughout Africa, and to highlight the growing concerns of wildlife crimes happening all over the world. My dream to have an education scheme running throughout Africa educating people to understand and protect wildlife from an early age is something I share with DSWF.”

When asked about the challenge that may befall him on his epic journey this summer, Chaz seems unfazed by the dangers “The terrain will be testing, the heat will be a big factor, the wildlife and mosquitoes will be trying to eat me, border crossings might be tricky. I will encounter Lions, elephants, hippos, rhinos, buffalo, crocs, snakes, leopards, cheetahs, wild dogs and a fair few more. To be honest there is quite a lot that could go wrong. Guess that makes it all the more exciting and challenging for me.”

“The Water-to-Go bottle will make the crucial difference in obtaining safe clean drinking water, whilst hiking along the wilds of the Mighty Zambezi River. Recently, whilst traversing La Palma, I used my Water-to-Go bottle to drink from streams, rivers, canals and even water dripping from rocks, it made all the difference.”

Chaz has a wealth of expedition experience “I’m a summer mountain leader and have recently became an expedition leader. I have walked several long distance paths in the UK including the UK’s longest river (The Severn) over 12 days.” The 36 year old from Shropshire is not taking the expedition lightly and has been doing training walks along the Zambezi, walking with a guide and armed guard through the Mosi-o-Tunya national park, learning how to walk amongst wild animals, as well as a walk along the Zambezi Gorges (one of the trickiest sections of the expeditions) and a walk through the African bush.

“During January I was on an expedition hitchhiking to Europe’s most Northern Point on a small budget to film and admire the Northern Lights. I have just finished walking the length of La Palma the world’s steepest island. It is such a mega diverse island with jungles, caves, volcanoes, ice capped mountains, alpine forests and some of the most amazing sites I have ever witnessed.”

You can follow his journey on:

If you would like to support Chaz and help raise funds for wildlife conservation throughout Africa you can donate on his Just Giving page.

The Dangers of Cryptosporidium

In the past 3 weeks, 300,000 homes in Lancashire have been without clean water after a Cryptosporidium outbreak in the local tap water. Residents were advised to boil all water before use.

We are proud to be able to say we filter well over 99.9% of Cryptosporidium; which means that our customers were not affected by the ‘boil water notice’ and were able to drink safely from their Water-to-Go bottles, without having to boil first.

Over the past few weeks we’ve been inundated with questions on the subject so we thought we’d quickly explain what cryptosporidium is and how we tackle it.

What is Cryptosporidium?

Cryptosporidium is a small protozoan parasite that affects the intestines of mammals, which of course includes humans. It causes “cryptosporidiosis”.

The parasite is very hard to deal with because, although it is easily passed from one person or animal to another, it is not easily destroyed, as it produces a resistant spore called an oocyst. There are 10 recognized Cryptosporidium species that live in different host animals.

The parasite is primarily transmitted via water contaminated by faeces. If the parasite gets into the public water supply, fatal results can occur. In 1993, 60 people died after more than 400,000 people were infected in Milwaukee in Wisconsin.

Cryptosporidium is highly resistant to chlorine disinfection.

How does Cryptosporidium affect Humans?

The symptoms of people suffering from “cryptosporidiosis” are primarily diarrhoea and its affects – dizziness, feeling lightheaded, or nausea are just some of the signs of dehydration and overheating. As these are very general symptoms, Cryptosporidium is usually only diagnosed after examination of a stool sample.

For those with a weakened immune system, the effects of infection will be more severe.

How Water-to-Go filters help you avoid Cryptosporidium?

Cryptosporidium parasites have water borne oocysts, 4-6 μm in diameter. As parasites they live in the host’s intestines, so to stop them you need to be careful what you drink. The Water-to-Go filter system has an effective pore size of less than 0.7 μm preventing the cryptosporidium from getting through.

Over 99.9%? What does it all mean?

At Water-to-Go, we’re proud to say that our filters remove over 99.9% of all microbiological contaminants and more.

We constantly get asked, “what’s the 0.1 you don’t filter out”. In actual fact, when we say over 99.9%, we mean a great deal more. We benchmark ourselves against the highest possible standards.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have guidelines, widely adopted across the world as benchmark testing criteria for microbiological filtration. Many countries have adopted these guidelines in the absence of any other international protocols and levels.

The purpose for the guidelines are established in their introduction:

“as a testing guide to manufacturers wishing to have their units considered as microbiological water purifiers, whether registered or not, and for the evaluation of such testing data; as a guide to consumers regarding what they can expect from microbiological water purifiers tested according to this standard and protocol; to assist in the research and development of microbiological treatment units for possible military applications.”

The EPA criteria and guidelines demand the following percentage reduction:

  • 6 log10 (99.9999%) for bacteria
  • 4 log10 (99.99%) for viruses
  • 3 log10 (99.9%) micro organisms

Our testing reports from BCS, (a major US laboratory which performs testing in accordance with NSF, EPA and NELAC protocols) shows that both sizes of filters used in the 50 cls and 75 cls bottles deliver the following results, which meet or exceed the EPA requirements:

  • 6 log10 (99.9999%) for bacteria
  • 5-6 log10 (99.999-99.9999%) for viruses
  • 4 log10 (99.99%) micro organisms

Impressive results for such a lightweight filter!